Hip Replacement 10: Finale

Not a grand finale — alas — I didn’t make my 3 mile goal. The furthest I journeyed on foot before the six weeks were up (yesterday) was about 2 and 2/3 miles.

However, I got to check in with the whole neighborhood. Mary Catherine Lamb’s house is getting a grand renovation, with new solar panels on the roof and lots of mysterious workers carrying two-by-fours around. The housing stock on my walking route is still its wondrously mixture of old Portland styles, a few ranch houses,  “motel-8” apartment complexes, some wonderful old apartment complexes, tons of pre-war single family houses, one assisted living complex, one church, one elementary school, and plants beyond belief, most just verging on out-of-controlness (like the ones in our yard). There’s even a mansion or two, one of which (The Harry McCormick Mansion built in 1907–1910) that’s up for sale for something like 1.5 million. Mercy!

This is not our house, nor the for-sale mansion, but a place that was derelict a few years back. It was bought and flipped just before the crash, and the new owners seem to be taking great care of it. I like it in part because just beyond it is the only madrone (arbutus) tree I’ve found on my daily journeys.

I also like this motel-style apartment; the tenants keep their flowers carefully tended.

But back to the Hip Replacement: I am now wearing my jeans, having given over the wrap-around skirts, ditched the cane, and taken up sleeping in my own bed upstairs. I’m brushing my teeth in the Big Bathroom, also upstairs, a boon I hadn’t given a thought to prior to doing all my ablutions in the beautiful but tiny downstairs facility. I think I brush my teeth like I talk — with my hands going in all directions.

I have worked in the studio once (earlier this evening) and hope to do a plein air painting stint tomorrow with Willa. I can pick things up off the floor provided they aren’t too flat, but I had to make Jer dig out some paper from a low cabinet where it was hiding. I even trimmed some Cotoneaster in the parking last night; it was threatening to eat the commuters who like to park on our street.

So with any luck, this is the last report from the hip replacement saga. From here on out, I have few excuses not to do art, help with the gardening, produce reports from this part of the world, and generally behave as if I were a whole person. Which I am, even more so now that part of my anatomy has been replaced with titanium. The bionic woman, at last.

Oh yes, our magnolia tree is blooming, a mixed blessing, since it scatters its petals in Jer’s pristine garden room, and will shortly be throwing down its seed pods on unsuspecting passersby. But right now, it’s heavenly.

–June

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7 Responses to Hip Replacement 10: Finale

  1. June says:

    Rayna,

    It’s definitely feeling bionic. I’m positively giddy every time I do something like clip my toenails And I’m back to painting, which practically makes me dance. Of course, I collapse into heaps heaps of time, but not all the time, and that alone is miraculous.

    Thanks for checking in.

    Like

  2. rayna says:

    Whew! Back to real life — what a treat. And now, better than ever. Enjoy yourself now that you have (no doubt) the super powers of the bionic!

    Like

  3. june says:

    Thanks, all. Del, I thought of you when I picked that magnolia to show. I made an art piece from the photo once upon a time — I think it’s long gone, but the photo is still here.
    Carole, your chatelaine served me well. I’ve now folded it away — my blue jeans pockets are back in service. But I’m saving it. We are having some uncharitable thoughts about our old house (c.1900); it seems to be falling apart faster than we can keep it together.
    Reva — I don’t believe you — you and Jerry seem to go everywhere and do everything — and you have to walk at least 10 miles a day to get there:-)
    Lia, thanks for the offer of govt. work, but I think I’ll pass. But we might get to see you sometime; I’m lobbying for that trip into the head of the Rogue. We might have to settle for the Metolius, though. We’ll see….

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  4. Lia says:

    2-2/3 miles? good enough for government work! 🙂 Congrats on all your achievements– getting up and down stairs, picking things up off the floor, painting…! I hope that means I’ll get a visit from you two later this summer.

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  5. Reva Basch says:

    Three miles is a substantial walk, even for us non-bionic types. Or maybe that’s ESPECIALLY for us non-bionic types.
    In any event, congratulations on the transition back to what passes for normalcy!

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  6. I have appreciated ‘watching’ you recover through you posts and want to congratulate you on your recovery.. bionic to boot! ha… I am impressed with your walking distance… 3 miles is a good walk and being 1/3 short is as good as done, in my opinion. I enjoyed your photos of the homes in your area. Portland is one of my favorite cities… I love the bridges and old homes. Back in the ’70’2 I visited for the first time with an aunt… took a picture of a delightful old house. A couple or so years ago, I did a small piece of art using the photo …. it is one of my favorites.
    If you are interested… here it is:
    http://wyndhavenartandquilts.blogspot.com/2007/10/architecture.html

    Wishing you every BEST there is….

    Like

  7. Del Thomas says:

    It is thrilling to know a REAL bionic woman. Nice to be ‘better than new’, huh? Your magnolia image is awesome – I’ve never seen one more beautiful. Sending good thoughts. Love, Del

    Like

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